Dr. Emma Buckley

 

St Andrew's University

   

 

Curriculum vitae
 

Dr Emma Buckley is Lecturer in Latin and Classical Studies at the University of St Andrews (2006-present). Her first degree was from New Hall (now Murray Edwards College), Cambridge (1998-2001) and she completed her PhD at Cambridge under the supervision of Prof. John Henderson.  


 

Wichtigste Publikationen:

Monographs and Edited Volumes

  • Buckley, E.  & Dinter, M. T. D. (2013). A Companion to the Neronian Age. (Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World). Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Buckley, E. & Paleit, E. (forthcoming 2015). Thomas May: Lucan's Pharsalia. (Tudor and Stuart Translations). Modern Humanities Research Association.

Articles and Book Chapters

  • Buckley, E. (2006). Ending the 'Aeneid'? Closure and Continuation in Maffeo Vegio's 'Supplementum'. Vergilius, 52(1), 111–140
  • Buckley, E. (2011). 'Live false Aeneas!' Marlowe's Dido, Queen of Carthage and the limits of translation. Classical Receptions Journal, 3(2), 129–147.
  • Buckley, E. (2013). Nero insitiuus: constructing Neronian identity in the pseudo-Senecan Octavia. In Gibson, A. G. G. (Ed.), The Julio-Claudian Succession. (pp. 133–154). (Mnemosyne Supplements). Leiden: Brill.
  • Buckley, E. (2013). Senecan Tragedy. In Buckley, E. L., & Dinter, M. T. D. (Eds.), The Blackwell Companion to the Neronian Age. (Blackwell Companions to the Ancient World). Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Buckley, E. (2013). Maffeo Vegio. In Pollmann, K. F., Lambert, D., & Visser, A. (Eds.), Oxford Guide to the Historical Reception of Augustine. Oxford University Press.
  • Buckley, E. (2013). Matthew Gwinne’s Nero (1603): Seneca, Academic Drama, and the Politics of Polity. Canadian Review of Comparative Literature, 40(1), 16–33
  • Buckley, E. L. (forthcoming 2015). Ending the Argonautica: Giovanni Battista Pio’s Argonautica-Supplement (1519). In Simms, R. (Ed.), The Brill Companion to Epic Continuations . Brill.
  • Buckley, E. (forthcoming 2016). Nero in the margins – Academic Text and Political Context in Matthew Gwinne’s Nero: Nova Tragaedia (1603). In Knight, S. & Sandis, E. (Eds.) Theatrum Mundi: Latin Drama in Early Modern Europe. (Renaissance Studies Special Issue). Wiley-Blackwell.